It’s getting kids to eat what parents serve that causes so many problems.

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DINA ROSE, PhD is a sociologist, parent educator and feeding expert empowering parents to raise kids who eat right.

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Links

Dinner Together Building Healthy Families One Meal at a Time.

Food Politics Marion Nestle's intelligent take on the politics of food and nutrition.

Fooducate Like Having a Dietician on Speed dial.

Hoboken Family Alliance A terrific resource for people living in the great city of Hoboken, NJ.

The Lunch Tray Everything you need to know about improving school lunches.

Parent Hacks Forehead-Smackingly Smart Tips

Raise Healthy Eaters One of the best blogs (other than my own) for learning to raise healthy eaters.

Real Mom Nutrition Tales from the Trenches. Advice for the Real World. From a mom-nutritionist who knows!

Stay and Play The best indoor playspace on the East Coast. Oh yeah, and it happens to be owned by my brother.

weelicious Great Recipes for Kids 

Entries in Vegetables (78)

Tuesday
Oct072014

When There's No Time for School Lunch

One problem when school lunch time shrinks? VEGGIES GET FORGOTTEN!

Of course, not having sufficient time to eat is a huge problem. As is not having enough "down time" to restore young attention spans.

But the veggies? That’s a relatively easy solution to solve (providing your children will eat vegetables under normal circumstances).

1) Talk to your children about the problem.

In my experience, many parents of young children try to manage the problem and the solution without talking to their kids.

This is a mistake.

  • It’s harder for kids to do what you want them to do when they don’t know what you want them to do.
  • Talking to your children about problems and solutions is a way to teach them to problem solve.
  • Problem-solving with your children builds the trusting rapport around food that many families lack.
  • Sometimes parents mis-identify the problem.

"Sometimes there's not enough time at lunch to eat everything. Right? I've noticed lately that you dig right into your sandwich but you don't eat the broccoli." 

  • "Is that because you don't like the broccoli?"

In this case, you'll know not to send broccoli because repeatedly sending food that doesn't get eaten in the hopes that one day it will (magically) get eaten is crazy. Read The Bad News ABout Healthy Lunches.

  • "Or is that because you don't have time for anything else if you eat your sandwich first?"

When children dig into their favorite food first (the sandwich, the pasta, the pizza) they don't have time—and they often don't have a lot of stomach space left—for anything else. That is the problem.

Solving the Sandwich-First Problem with One-One

Here's the lesson: "You need to eat a little bit of everything before you eat all of anything."

Children don't automatically know this.

Here's the technique: "Eat one bite of this and then one bite of that until you've had one bite of everything on your plate. Then take a second bite of this and a second bite of that..."

Read more about One-One here.

One-One isn't meant to be dogmatic—no need to count bites! Nonetheless, it's an important lesson for children to learn: 

"We never know when we are going to run out of time at school lunch. Therefore, it's important to eat a little of everything from the beginning of the lunch period."

One-One is the right habit in general. It's the right habit for this problem.

Let's fight for change at the school-level, but let's not WAIT for change to address the problem.

~Changing the conversation from nutrition to habits.~

Wednesday
Aug132014

Are Packed Lunches Healthy? Research Says, "No."

By now you've probably heard about the research study which found that home-packed lunches are often nutritionally inferior to school lunches.

The study found:
  • Only 27% of home-packed lunches met at least 3 of 5 National School Lunch Program standards
  • Only 4% of snacks met 2 of 4 Child and Adult Care Food Program standards.

The Boston Globe wrote about this study, and I was thrilled that my thoughts were included in the article. Read At lunch, home-packed may not mean healthy.

Three things stand out from this study for me...

1) The easiest way to improve the quality of your child's diet is to improve snacks.

You could, if you wanted, forget about lunch. Snacks are where the action really is.

Desserts & sweetened beverages are the major source of calories children consume from snacks. But salty snacks are gaining ground! Read The Snack Attack.

Teach your kids that, from a habits perspective, snack is a time of day, not a type of food.

  • Make fruits and vegetables the go-to for snacks. You don't have to do this everyday, but most days would be the ideal goal.
  • Start off small. One or two bites of fruit or vegetable, combined with other "snack" foods would be a good start.
  • Talk to your children before you pack their snacks. Otherwise the fruits and vegetables will definitely come home uneaten!

When I wrote about this on my Facebook page, someone noted that her child got teased when he brought vegetables for lunch. While my general thought is, "Shame on those other children," my other thought is, "Children need to learn lots of life lessons and being different is one of them. This is actually a gentle way to begin that conversation with your kids.

2) It's easy to think we have only two choices: send a healthy lunch or send a junky one. This is a false dichotomy.

Baby steps change habits in the longterm, and that's what you're after. Consider using:

~Changing the conversation from nutrition to habits.~

SourceHubbard, K. L., A. Must, M. Eliasziw, S. C. Folta, and J. Goldberg. 2014. “What's in Children's Backpacks: Foods Brought From Home.” Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics In press.

Tuesday
Jun032014

3 Ways to Get Your Kids to Eat More Fruits & Vegetables

I've often been critical of modeling as a technique for increasing kids' vegetable consumption.

It's not that I think modeling isn't important. It's that I think modeling just isn't powerful enough.

Imagine someone telling you that the best way to teach your kids how to dress themselves is to let them "catch" you wearing clothes.

Kids need to see you eating fruits and vegetables, for sure. But they also need to learn how to taste new foods, to develop a foundation of eating a variety of foods, to become more familiar with the sensory properties of fruits and vegetables. The list of the skills kids need to learn to develop healthy eating habits goes on.

Having said that...

A new study shows that not all modeling is equally effective. So...

Parents, start eating:

  • Fruit at dinner
  • Green salad at dinner
  • Vegetables at snack

It's not that these modeling moments are more powerful than modeling, say, eating vegetables at dinner. Rather...

Teaching children to eat fruits and vegetables throughout the day increases their total consumption.

Read Change How Your Kids Snack

The same logic applies to adding salad and fruit to dinner. Read Salad Days and Dishing Up Dessert.

Rather than fight with your kids to eat a few more bites of vegetables at dinner, give your kids more opportunities to eat only a few bites.

  • A few bites add up across the day
  • Eating fruits and vegetables throughout the day is simply the right habit

~Changing the conversation from nutrition to habits.~

Source: Draxten, M., J. A. Fulkerson, S. Friend, C. F. Flattum, and R. Schow. 2014. “Parental Role Modeling of Fruits and Vegetables At Meals and Snacks is Associated With Children's Adequate Consumption.” Appetite 78C: 1-7.