It’s getting kids to eat what parents serve that causes so many problems.

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DINA ROSE, PhD is a sociologist, parent educator and feeding expert empowering parents to raise kids who eat right.
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Dinner Together Building Healthy Families One Meal at a Time.

Food Politics Marion Nestle's intelligent take on the politics of food and nutrition.

Fooducate Like Having a Dietician on Speed dial.

Hoboken Family Alliance A terrific resource for people living in the great city of Hoboken, NJ.

The Lunch Tray Everything you need to know about improving school lunches.

Parent Hacks Forehead-Smackingly Smart Tips

Raise Healthy Eaters One of the best blogs (other than my own) for learning to raise healthy eaters.

Real Mom Nutrition Tales from the Trenches. Advice for the Real World. From a mom-nutritionist who knows!

Stay and Play The best indoor playspace on the East Coast. Oh yeah, and it happens to be owned by my brother.

weelicious Great Recipes for Kids 

Entries in Fruit (12)

Tuesday
Jun032014

3 Ways to Get Your Kids to Eat More Fruits & Vegetables

I've often been critical of modeling as a technique for increasing kids' vegetable consumption.

It's not that I think modeling isn't important. It's that I think modeling just isn't powerful enough.

Imagine someone telling you that the best way to teach your kids how to dress themselves is to let them "catch" you wearing clothes.

Kids need to see you eating fruits and vegetables, for sure. But they also need to learn how to taste new foods, to develop a foundation of eating a variety of foods, to become more familiar with the sensory properties of fruits and vegetables. The list of the skills kids need to learn to develop healthy eating habits goes on.

Having said that...

A new study shows that not all modeling is equally effective. So...

Parents, start eating:

  • Fruit at dinner
  • Green salad at dinner
  • Vegetables at snack

It's not that these modeling moments are more powerful than modeling, say, eating vegetables at dinner. Rather...

Teaching children to eat fruits and vegetables throughout the day increases their total consumption.

Read Change How Your Kids Snack

The same logic applies to adding salad and fruit to dinner. Read Salad Days and Dishing Up Dessert.

Rather than fight with your kids to eat a few more bites of vegetables at dinner, give your kids more opportunities to eat only a few bites.

  • A few bites add up across the day
  • Eating fruits and vegetables throughout the day is simply the right habit

~Changing the conversation from nutrition to habits.~

Source: Draxten, M., J. A. Fulkerson, S. Friend, C. F. Flattum, and R. Schow. 2014. “Parental Role Modeling of Fruits and Vegetables At Meals and Snacks is Associated With Children's Adequate Consumption.” Appetite 78C: 1-7.

Tuesday
May272014

Change How Your Kids Snack

The easiest way to change how your kids eat is to change how they snack.

Most parents I know think of meals as The Nutrition Zone— The time when parents try to pack in the nutrients—and snacks as the Fun Zone (or maybe it's the Forgotten Zone).

Here's the math on Fruits and Vegetables: On average, children consume....
  • Less than 3 servings per day
  • Less than half of one serving at snack time
  • Slightly more than 1 serving at dinner

Changing Snack Behavior is easier than changing Dinner Beahvior because...

Adding some to zero gives you a bigger mathematical bang-for-your-buck than adding more to some.

If your children eat 2 snacks each day, and if those snacks usually featured fruits and vegetables, that would add up to a big change in their diets...even if your kids only ate a few bites at each snack.

On the other hand, getting kids who normally eat 3 or 4 bites of vegetable at dinner to eat 5, 6, or 7 bites would probably be a lot of work for YOU. And you'd probably resort to begging, bribing, etc. (You know not to do that, right? Read Wheelin' & Dealin': 10 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Trade Peas for Pie.)

Fruits and Vegetables should be your kids' Go-To Snack.

I know, you think your kids won't eat fruits and vegetables at snack time and you don't want them to be hungry. Or, your kids are in school where they don't serve fruits and vegs at snacktime. Or fruits and vegetables aren't really portable.

I hear you. To these real objections and problems I say:

  • Instead of emphasizing health, talk to your kids about proportion. Fruits and vegetables should show up in the diet more frequently as a group than crackers, cookies, salty snacks, etc.
  • It's ok to let children refuse a snack. It teaches them that temporary hunger is survivable. Think of this as letting your kids build an appetite.
  • If your kids have a meltdown, this is a behavioral problem, not a food problem. And even if you know that food would solve the meltdown, you still have to teach your kids how to behave even if they're hungry.
  • Compensate for schools that serve lots of crackers and salty snacks by making sure you serve healthy after-school snacks. Again, teach the concept of proportion.
  • It's just as easy to grab an apple as it is to grab a bag of Goldfish crackers. But I hear you: why not store some apples and oranges in the car, replacing/replenishing every few days? Or pre-cut/pre-bag fruit and keep it in the refrigerator?

If you want your kids to eat more fruits and vegetables you have to serve more fruits and vegetables.

Eating is really a matter of math. Kids want to eat the foods they're most accustomed to eating.

Research shows that kids today take in a lot more calories from snacks than they did a generation ago.

Sadly, the research also shows that kids don't compensate for consuming more calories during snack by consuming fewer calories at meals.

And even sadder is this news: Most snack calories come from desserts and sweetened beverages, but salty snacks – i.e. potato chips, tortilla chips, pretzels -- and candy are the fastest growing category of snack consumption.

Read Snacks: The Gifts That Keep On Giving

Your Kids won't be the only ones to benefit from better snacking. Your life will improve too.

To find out how, read 10 Ways Improving Your Kids' Snacking Will Improve YOUR Life. 

~Changing the conversation from nutrition to habits.~

Source "Here's the math...": Draxten, M., J. A. Fulkerson, S. Friend, C. F. Flattum, and R. Schow. 2014. “Parental Role Modeling of Fruits and Vegetables At Meals and Snacks is Associated With Children's Adequate Consumption.” Appetite 78C: 1-7.

Wednesday
May072014

8 Steps to More Fruits and Vegetables

Most parents I know wish their children would eat more fruits and vegetables.

But guess what? The pressure tactics most parents use to accomplish this are counterproductive. They teach kids to hate fruits and vegetables, not love them.

Read 10 Ways Kids Learn to HATE Veggies and 10 Ways Kids Learn to LOVE Veggies.

Here are two things I know for sure:

1) What your kids are used to eating determines what they like.

Eating is really a matter of math. Read Pizza and Peas: The Untold Story.

2) Taste preferences are formed more than they're found.

Your job isn't to discover what your kids like. It's to shape what they like. Read You Catch More Flies with Honey.

Still, kids can be very opinionated about what they will and will not eat.

That's what makes this whole feeding-thing a real challenge!

With these two principles in mind...

7 Steps to More Fruits and Vegetables

  1. Pay attention to the flavors and texture you expose your kids to the most. Read Kids Can't Like Food They Haven't Tasted.
  2. Don't justify questionable food choices with, what I call, Selective Attention: You focus on the nutrient you're interested (say calcium) and overlook the "problems" (like sugar). Read Virus Sufferers Choose Granola.
  3. Slowly shift your kids' diets towards the kinds of tastes and textures you find in healthy foods. In practice this might mean starting with canned peaches in heavy syrup, moving to canned peaches in light syrup, to canned peaches in fruit juice, and finally, to real peaches. Read For Extreme Fruit and Vegetable Avoiders...
  4. Teach your kids to be good tasters.This happens separately and BEFORE they'll be good eaters. Read A Cool Way to Teach Toddlers to Taste New Food.
  5. Talk about the concept of proportion, so your kids know the eating habits you're aiming to teach them. Read You Can't Make Me Eat It!
  6. Set limits on how many sweets and treats your kids can eat in a day or a week, but let your kids decide when they actually eat their sweets and treats. Read The How-to-Control-Your-Kids'-Candy-Consumption Con.
  7. Remember that pressure is your enemy. Read The Pressure-Cooker Problem
  8. Be happy with a Happy Bite. Read The Happy Bite.

 

~Changing the conversation from nutrition to habits.~