Free Resource Sheets to Teach Healthy Eating Habits

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DINA ROSE, PhD is a sociologist, parent educator and feeding expert empowering parents to raise kids who eat right.
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Dinner Together Building Healthy Families One Meal at a Time.

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Raise Healthy Eaters One of the best blogs (other than my own) for learning to raise healthy eaters.

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Entries in Candy (24)

Monday
Jun132016

Study: Fresh Fruit is Better Than Candy. Can You Say, "Duh?"

Yes, we need this kind of research, but really, I don't think anyone would be surprised by the results. Which snack is more filling? 

  • 65 calories of mixed berries (strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries)
  • 65 calories of a fruit-flavored candy (made with real fruit juice)

Give people a snack: one day candy, another day fruit. An hour later, let them eat as much pasta as they want. What happened?

A 20% increase in pasta calories after the candy compared to the fruit.

  • The candy snackers consumed 825 calories' worth of pasta
  • The fruit snackers consumed 690 calories' worth of pasta

From a nutrition perspective, fruit is clearly healthier than candy. But it's the habits perspective that matters more.

From a habits perspective, it is important to teach kids that fruit and vegetables are the go-to food. Plus, every bite pays off. The better your kids eat at snack, the less you have to worry about how well they eat at dinner. 

Read Fruit and Vegetables at Every Meal and Every Snack, Every Darned Day and 10 Ways Improving Your Kids' Snacking Will Improve YOUR Life.

This was a small study, only 12 women, but I don't think we need much more to establish that eating fruit holds you over between meals better than candy.

Candy ingredients: Sugar, Glucose Syrup (contains Sulphites), Water, Gelatine, Concentrated Fruit Juices** (1%) (Apple, Strawberry, Blackcurrant, Raspberry), Acid (Citric Acid), Colours (Anthocyanins, Vegetable Carbon), Flavourings, **Equivalent to 5.5% Fruit Juice

Fruit ingredients: Fruit

  • Less sugar
  • More volume
  • More fiber
  • More chewing

And...reinforcing the importance of the mind: researchers speculate that the fruit snack may have produced higher expected satiety. People think they're fuller and more satisfied so afterwards they eat less food.

Enough said!

Thanks to The Center for Science in the Public Interest for writing about this study in their Jan/Feb 2016 Nutrition Action Healthletter.

~Changing the conversation from nutrition to habits.~

Source: James, L. J., M. P. Funnell, and S. Milner. 2015. “An Afternoon Snack of Berries Reduces Subsequent Energy Intake Compared to an Isoenergetic Confectionary Snack.” Appetite 95: 132-37.

Thursday
Oct222015

How to Stop Stressing About Halloween Candy

It's time for the Halloween hysteria to begin: What should you do with all that Halloween candy?

 

I've written about this a lot. Every year, in fact. And I always say pretty much the same thing:

  • Take this as an opportunity to teach your kids some healthy eating habits.
  • Rather than stress out about how to get rid of the candy, why not use some smart strategies for lightening the load.
  • Hiding, dumping, buying back, and switch-witch'n are all ways to teach your kids the wrong lessons.

All the stress about Halloween highlights the mixed messages our culture sends our kids about the role of sweets and treats in their lives.  

Show of hands: How many people delighted in the theirs baby's first birthday cake? I just saw a video declaring, "Smash cakes are all the rage!"

How many parents give their kids the chocolate cake "look"—I know you know what I mean—every time they bring out sweets and treats?

Or say to their kids, when the ice cream they order is bigger than their bodies, "Can't wait to see you eat that!!!"

And how many of us talk up the Halloween candy in advance, only to talk it down the morning after?

It's a little crazy, our culture glorifies, then vilifies, sweets and treats. Halloween is just one example of this phenomenon.

Here an inventory of my past Halloween posts to help you cope

  • Lighten the Halloween haul so you don't have to resort to dumping: Halloween Candy
  • How to avoid the hidden problem with Halloween—it teaches kids to eat what they have, not what they want: A Better Buy-Back

And just because the Halloween "problem" is not limited to Halloween...

Is it fair to dump your kids' candy if they've "earned" it? I doubt my answer will surprise you: All's Fair...In Love, War and Feeding Kids!

~Changing the conversation from nutrition to habits.~

Thursday
Sep242015

Why I Gave My Daughter Chocolate Cake for Breakfast

I gave my daughter chocolate cake for breakfast this morning and I had some very good reasons!

Reason #1: We broke our Yom Kippur fast last night with a feast, and when we got to the end of the meal my daughter said she wanted some chocolate babka but she was too full.

So I said I'd save it for her.

My message: It is safe for you to forgo the babka tonight because it will be waiting for you whenever you want it.

Have you ever thought about Dessert Insecurity? It's not believing that your piece of the pie will still be there when you're ready for it.

And so we eat dessert, whether or not we want it, and whether or not we're full.

I grew up with a couple of brothers who would devour everything in sight, so I know a thing or two about dessert insecurity.

By the way, I made up the term dessert insecurity, at least as far as I know.

Kids need to know that what is theirs is theirs.

Think of this as Dessert Security.

I highly recommend thinking about Dessert Security anytime you suspect that your kids are eating simply because they need to make sure they get their share of the goodies.

Dessert Security is a useful tool for teaching the habit Moderation. (The other two habits that translate nutrition into behavior are proportion and variety.)

Moderation: Eating when you are hungry, stopping when you are full, and not eating because you are bored, sad or lonely—or worried that your favorite cake will be gone before you get a piece!

This is why I recommend a candy drawer. Read:

In case you're worried about how unhealthy the babka is, it compares pretty well to other common breakfast foods.

Yes it has a lot of sugar, but not more than pancakes with syrup. On the other hand, it has way fewer calories and lots less fat than a bagel with cream cheese. And the babka has as much protein as Honey Nut Cheerios.

By the way, I served the babka with a glass of milk.

Let me be clear: I'm not saying that cake is a healthy breakfast. I am saying that it isn't much worse than some of the standard stuff. You can see the comparisons below.

Most importantly, my daughter knows that cake for breakfast is a treat.

Most kids don't think of marginal breakfast fare as treats. Yes, I'm talking about pancakes, waffles, sugary cereal, muffins or even a bagel with cream cheese.

One serving (1.5 oz) of Green's Babka, Chocolate, Original

  • Calories=160
  • Fat=5g
  • Protein=2g
  • Fiber=1g
  • Sugar=18g

I didn't serve this brand, but the cake I bought didn't have a nutrition facts label.

(For those of you who aren't familiar with chocolate babka, it's kind of like a coffee cake, or a bread, made with sweet yeast dough and, usually, either chocolate or cinnamon. For some funny about babka watch this Seinfeld Episode.)

A plain bagel and cream cheese from a place like Panera Bread:

  • Calories=490
  • Fat=19.5g
  • Protein=13g
  • Fiber=2g
  • Sugar=3g

Honey Nut Cheerios 

  • Calories=110
  • Fat=1.5g
  • Protein=2g
  • Fiber=2g
  • Sugar=9g

Two Eggo Blueberry pancakes without any syrup deliver about 7grams of sugar.  Add the syrup and you’re up in Coke territory.  Two ounces of syrup– I know it sounds like a lot but those small fast food packets contain-- has approximately 32g of sugar. Read Cookies for Breakfast.

My other reasons for dishing up cake for breakfast...

Reason #2: New braces=sore mouth.

Reason #3: The desire to make my daugther happy...but I've confessed before. Read Hot Chocolate to Soothe the Soul. Then read Falafel for Breakfast.

~Changing the conversation from nutrition to habits.~